Inertia

📅 Published on March 14, 2021

“Inertia”

Written by Ryan Harville
Edited by Craig Groshek
Thumbnail Art by Craig Groshek
Narrated by N/A

Copyright Statement: Unless explicitly stated, all stories published on CreepypastaStories.com are the property of (and under copyright to) their respective authors, and may not be narrated or performed, adapted to film, television or audio mediums, republished in a print or electronic book, reposted on any other website, blog, or online platform, or otherwise monetized without the express written consent of its author(s).

🎧 Available Audio Adaptations: None Available

ESTIMATED READING TIME — 5 minutes

Rating: 9.67/10. From 3 votes.
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The midday sun stood at its zenith, bathing them in unforgiving heat. Brendan wiped sweat from his brow with the heel of his hand, then dried it on the edge of his shirt.

“Christ, it’s hot,” Brendan said. “Remind me never to go to an amusement park in the summer again.”

Kali nodded, her damp hair swinging. “It wouldn’t be so bad if this line would move. At least there’ll be a breeze on the roller coaster.”

The line ahead of them stretched until Brendan couldn’t see the entrance to the ride. The people in front of him talked in a low murmur. He absentmindedly scratched his arm and stared into the distance at the shimmering heat on the asphalt.

“It feels like we’ve been here forever,” he said. “What time is it?”

She looked at her phone. “Noon.”

“When was the last time I asked?”

“Noon,” she said, then leaned close and wrapped her arm around his waist. “Cheer up! It’s hot, but it’s a beautiful day. We’re going to have fun, right?”

He smiled, buoyed by her enthusiasm. “Yeah, of course.”

Far overhead, the roller coaster’s cars sped by, going into a loop. The cars hung upside down for a few seconds, then zoomed off again, the screams of the occupants following behind.

“That did not sound fun,” Brendan said, annoyed.

“But it is!” Kali said. “It loops and you’re just hanging there, and it feels like it’ll never move, then you take off again like a rocket.”

“I’m glad we waited on lunch,” he said.

Brendan grasped the rail and leaned to the side, trying to get a better look at the front of the line.

“What are you looking at? Some hot girl up there?” Kali said playfully.

“Everyone here is hot.”

“Okay, smartass,” she said. “Seriously.”

He shook his head. “Nothing. Just seeing if anyone is moving.”

“The wait is part of the experience,” Kali said. “Now stop complaining. This is the first time I’ve talked you into getting on a ride.”

Brendan chuckled, remembering their morning together. “Well, you can be very persuasive.”

“Brendan, shut up!” she whispered, blushing.

“I will as soon as this line–”

The line began to move forward.

“See?” Kali asked. “All part of the experience.”

He followed along at a snail’s pace, barely doing more than shuffling his feet. He could see the entrance to the park off to his left. ‘Funway Amusement Park,’ the sign read and huge yellow letters. ‘Where the fun never ends!’

Brendan silently hoped it would soon. Christ, it was hot. It felt like the soles of his sneakers were sticking to the concrete stove-top beneath his feet.

They came to a sudden halt. Brendan nearly tripped while trying not to run into the couple in front of him. Somewhere behind them a baby began to cry.

His patience was gone instantly. “Damn it! We only moved three feet, and now we have to hear that.”

“Chill, okay?” Kali said.

“I’m trying, but that crying feels like it’s in my head,” he said. “Who in the hell leaves a baby out in this heat?”

“I don’t know,” Kali said. “But don’t let it ruin your good time.”

The baby’s cry seemed to rise an octave. Brendan winced as sweat ran into one of his eyes. He lifted his shirt and used it to wipe his face. “This is bullshit. I tried, okay? But I’ve had enough. It’s too hot for this.”

She pressed against him. “We’ve already waited all this time! You can’t leave now.”

The tension behind his eyes felt like a weight. “I’m ready to go.

“Don’t make a scene,” she said, squeezing his arm.

“I’m not!” he hissed. “That screaming…I have to get out of here.”

He tapped the shoulder of the man behind him. “Hey, can we get by? We’re leaving.”

The man didn’t turn around.

“Hey, buddy,” he said. “Mind letting us pass?”

No response.

Brendan stared angrily at the back of the man’s head. “Fine,” he said, then turned to the woman standing next to the man. “Excuse me, can we…”

He trailed off. “Kali,” he said softly. “Why are they all looking away? The line is going that way. Why is everyone turned around?”

Kali tugged on his arm. “Come on, the line is moving!”

Brendan allowed himself to be pulled away, still looking over his shoulder at the back of the line.

The baby’s cry echoed overhead.

He shook his head as dizziness washed over him.

“I’m not feeling good,” he said. The line was really moving now, and he found himself nearly jogging to keep up. He tried to slow down but was shoved from behind.

“Hey!” he yelled, wheeling around, his fist pulled back. It was just people as far as he could see, and all of them facing away from him.

Kali pulled him with a strength that defied her frame. “Hurry!”

The entrance loomed ahead; a circle within a circle within a circle, all ringed with lights.

The coaster’s cars came screeching to a halt, sparks flying from the tracks. He’d never seen roller coaster cars like them. They were black and completely enclosed, their paint flaking and showing the orange-red rust beneath. Its doors rose slowly with a hiss of steam.

No one stepped out.

The operator faced away from them, one hand on a lever, the other turning the knob on an old radio. There was a burst of static, followed by a voice over the radio.

“Tragic news today–” the voice on the radio said.

Kali stepped onto the platform, still holding his arm.

“I can’t,” Brendan panted. “I don’t want to, okay? Let’s just go back.”

“That’s what you always say,” Kali said, grinning. “Now get in.”

“‘Always’? What are you talking about–?”

Kali helped him into the car, and he offered no resistance. It was oppressively hot, the cracked vinyl seat burning his thighs through his pants as he sat down.

“Does the window come down?” he asked, his hand on the glass. “It’s so hot.”

“No,” Kali said. “You know that.”

She shut the door.

“Hey!” he cried “What are you doing?!”

Static crackled.

“–police found the body of one-year-old Taylor Hollis. She had been left in a locked car–”

“Kali!” Brendan cried as panic gripped him. “Open the door!”

“–outside of the condemned Funway Amusement Park, a known location for drug activity–”

The operator pulled the lever. The car shook and began to move forward.

“–also in the vehicle was the body of twenty-eight-year-old Brendan Hollis, dead of an apparent overdose–“

He cried out as the hammer-blow of realization fell upon him.

Brendan began to weep as memories coursed through him like an electric current. Buying the junk, melting it down, pushing the plunger down on the syringe, the cottony bliss traveling up his arm and to his brain. The crying was so loud, but serenity had been sweet enough to drown it out.

“I’m so sorry!” Brendan screamed. “I never meant to hurt Taylor! I swear! It was an accident, goddammit! Please, don’t do this. Please!

“–ex-wife Kali Hollis refused to comment–”

The car began to climb the first of many hills, toward endless loops.

* * * * * *

The midday sun stood at its zenith, bathing them in unforgiving heat. Brendan wiped sweat from his brow with the heel of his hand, then dried it on the edge of his shirt.

“Christ, it’s hot,” Brendan said. “Remind me never to go to an amusement park in the summer again.”

Kali nodded, her damp hair swinging. “It wouldn’t be so bad if this line would move. At least there’ll be a breeze on the roller coaster.”

The line ahead of them stretched until Brendan couldn’t see the entrance to the ride. The people in front of him talked in a low murmur. He absentmindedly scratched his arm and stared at the shimmering heat on the asphalt.

“It feels like we’ve been here forever,” he said.

Rating: 9.67/10. From 3 votes.
Please wait...


🎧 Available Audio Adaptations: None Available


Written by Ryan Harville
Edited by Craig Groshek
Thumbnail Art by Craig Groshek
Narrated by N/A

🔔 More stories from author: Ryan Harville


Publisher's Notes: N/A

Author's Notes: N/A

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Copyright Statement: Unless explicitly stated, all stories published on CreepypastaStories.com are the property of (and under copyright to) their respective authors, and may not be narrated or performed, adapted to film, television or audio mediums, republished in a print or electronic book, reposted on any other website, blog, or online platform, or otherwise monetized without the express written consent of its author(s).

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